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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
senators from both parties grilled officials from the fbi and nsa about the lack of transparency around the nation's sprawling surveillance operation. signalling the defunding of the nsa's phone records. they will force the government to reveal how many americans have had their information reviewed by federal agents. this as president obama on the hill today, assured lawmakers he was hearing their concerns about the reach of the nsa and even agreed to meet with a number of them at the white house tomorrow. today meetings came just hours after the administration announced they would be declassifying the now infamous secret court order compelling verizon to hand over all their american customer's phone records in bulk. that was edward snowden's first revelation, the one that kicked this whole thing off. today we got his latest. the piece published by glenn greenwald, with documents provided by snowden, details another nsa surveillance program, a top secret national security agency program that allows analysts to search with no prior authorization through vast databases containing e-mails,
detail wrong. the detail having to do with race. >>> and later, is is all this coverage of the nsa an outgrowth of white privilege? our guests will debate whether or not liberals are favoring certain rights for certain people over others. >>> first i want to share the three awesomest things on internet today. beginning with video that is awesome in the sense that it is just absolutely crazy. bayou corn, louisiana, is the site of what "mother jones" calls the biggest ongoing industrial disasters in the united states you haven't heard of. state is suing a mining company called texas brine for allegedly causing a massive underground sinkhole surely, slowly swallowing the town. it is growing. the entire town of 340 people have been forced to evacuate. unfortunately, the trees surrounding the sinkhole don't have that option. check that out. the assumption parish emergency response team released this video wednesday. an entire grove of trees getting sucked down, 750 feet deep. notice they don't fall over. they get sucked down into the massive hole below. amazing and terrifying. the secon
. >>> good evening, from new york. i'm chris hayes. tonight on "all in" nsa leaker edward snowden leaves the moscow airport behind and enters russia with temporary asylum. what does it mean for his future? and for the already tense, fraught relationship between the united states and russia? >>> also tonight, you probably know who this tony bennett is, but there's another tony bennett who should be way more famous than he already is. thanks to an outrageous story of apparent corruption that you need to know about. >>> plus, mitch mcconnell has long lived by the old adage, slow and steady wins the race, but news out of kentucky should make the republican senate leader, too slow and very, very unsteady. >>> we begin tonight with a story that i honestly and frankly did not think would be topping our broadcast. today ariel castro was was sentenced to life in prison plus 1,000 years after pleading guilty to 937 counts including rape and kidnapping of three women, two of whom an suggested as teenagers and one of whom gave birth to his daughter during captivity. this may have been a routine proc
describing four steps he would take to make the nsa both more transparent and more accountability including working with congress to tighten the patriot act, making sure someone represents civil liberties concerns before the powerful and secretive surveillance courts. making public the legal rationale for the government's collection activities and other steps to be more transparent about the government's surveillance program. and forming a group of outside experts to review the government's intelligence and communication technologies. the president went on to describe the questions over the balance between national security and individual liberty as a necessary debate, one we need to be having. and he said those on both sides of it are patriots. >> the men and women of our intelligence community work every single day to keep us safe because they love this country and believe in our values. they're patriots, and i believe that those who have lawfully raised their voices on behalf of privacy and civil liberties are also patriots who love our country. this is how we're going to resolve differe
nsa documents. this past sunday miranda was detained by authorities in heathrow airport, returning from a trip in berlin where he met up with greenwald's clab raollabor laura poitras. he had his laptop confiscated, a mobile phone, smartdisk and video game console. he was held for seven hours under the terrorism act of 2000. asked about his association with greenwald and "the guardian's" reporting. miranda's lawyers are threatening legal action over what they and others are calling his, quote, unlawful detention. british government defended its decision to detain miranda in a statement today saying it was their right to stop anyone suspected of carrying "highly sensitive stolen information that would help terrorism." when u.s. officials were asked about the incident, they said they got a heads-up the london police were going to detain miranda but insisted they had nothing to do with it saying "this was a decision made by the british government without the government and not the request of the united states government." the editor of "the guardian" recounted yesterday a series of abs
straight-up lied to congress back in march about the nsa's collecting of data on americans. >> does the nsa collect any type of data at all on millions or hundreds of millions of americans? >> no, sir. >> it does not? >> not wittingly. there are cases where they could inadvertently, perhaps, collect, but not wittingly. i was asked when are you going to stop beating your wife kind of question which is meaning not answerable, necessarily, by a simple yes or no. so i responded in what i thought was the most truthful or least untruthful manner by saying no. >> that's the guy who's in charge of setting up the independent outside group of experts the president said would be in charge of making sure government surveillance programs maintain the trust of the people and are not abused. initial reports indicated that clapper, himself, would pick the members of the group. clapper's office has since pushed back and said he's not actually choosing members. according to the white house's me memo, this independent group will be answering to clapper, briefing the president on their findings and recommendat
control cited russia's decision to thumb the u.s. in the eye by granting nsa leaker edward snowden temporary asylum as a contributing factor. something the president touched on in an interview with jayleno last night too. >> i was disappointed because, you know, even though we don't have an extradition treaty with them, traditionally we have tried to respect if there's a law breaker or an alleged law breaker in their country, we evaluate it and we try to work with them, they didn't do that with us. >> that same interview the president spoke out forcefully against the gay propaganda law. >> i have no patience for countries that try to treat gays or lesbians or transgendered persons in ways that intimidate them or are harmful to them. what's happening in russia is not unique. one of the things i think is very important for me to speak out on making sure people are treated fairly and justly because that's what we stand for and i believe that that's a precept that's not unique to america. that is something that should apply everywhere. >> that law, which bans gay pride rallies and impo
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)